Episode 36 (Shakespeare’s Shapely Language)

Jan Gist

The topic for the January 2021 podcast is what Paul’s guest, Jan Gist, calls “Shakespeare’s Shapely Language.” Shapes is her term for literary or rhetorical tropes; she and Paul broaden the discussion to reflect on how such ancient devices figure in advertising, political oratory, and other forms of the spoken word today.

Jan Gist has been the voice, speech, and dialect coach for Old Globe productions on 89 shows and for 50 USD/Shiley MFA productions. She has coached at theatres around the country including Ahmanson Theatre, La Jolla Playhouse, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, The Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, D.C., The American Shakespeare Center, Utah Shakespearean Festival, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Arena Stage, San Diego Repertory, North Coast Repertory, Milwaukee Repertory, PlayMakers’ Repertory, Indiana Repertory, American Players Theatre, and Mo’olelo Performing Arts Company. She coached dialects for the film The Rosa Parks Story and recorded dozens of Books To Listen To.

She is an original member of the Voice and Speech Trainers Association (VASTA) and has presented at its conferences, as well as to Voice Foundation’s conferences. Gist has taught workshops at London’s Central School of Speech and Drama and the International Voice Teachers Exchange at the Moscow Art Theatre in Russia. She has been published in numerous VASTA journals. Chapters in books include an interview in Voice and Speech Training in the New Millennium: Conversations with Master Teachers, exercises in The Complete Voice And Speech Workout, and Yiddish, in Jerry Blunt’s More Stage Dialects. Most recently, her article “Voicing Poems”, including some of her own poems, was published in Voice and Speech Review. She is a professor in The Old Globe/USD Shiley Graduate Theatre Program.

For more information on Jan, visit her website: http://jangistspeaking.com.

(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)

Episode 1 (Shakespeare’s Original Pronunciation)

This first podcast focuses on Shakespeare’s Original Pronunciation (the dialect of English spoken in the late 16th and early 17th century). It also serves as an introduction to the entire In a Manner of Speaking series, as Paul briefly touches on several topics of upcoming podcasts. For more information about the Orlando Shakespeare Theater’s upcoming production of Twelfth Night, visit the site. And here is the Original Pronunciation text that Paul references:

If music be the food of love, play on
ɪf mju̹ːzɪk beː ðə fu̹ːd ə lɤv ple ɑːn

Give me excess of it, that surfeiting,
gɪ mɪ ɪksɛs əv ɪt ðət sɐ˞fətɪn

The appetite may sicken and so die.
ðɪ apətəit mɛ sɪkn̩ n̩ so dəi

That strain again! It had a dying fall.
ðat stɹɛːn əgɛn ɪt ad ə dəiɪn fɑːɫ

O, it came o’er my ear like the sweet sound
o ɪt kɛː oə˞ mɪ i˞ ləik ðə sweːt səʊnd

That breathes upon a bank of violets.
ðət bɹeːðz əpɑn ə baŋk ə vəiəlɪts

[Duke Orsino,  Twelfth Night, William Shakespeare, Act I, Scene 1]